hazell's of Co Norfolk
Synopsis: Part of a one-name study of Hazell/Hazle's in Co Norfolk, England
Surname Index Page Norfolk Index Hazell's - main page Hazell's of Pulham & Pulham Market Other Hazell's of Co Norfolk

Hazell's of Pulham & Pulham Market

Part of a genealogical study of the Hazell's of Co Norfolk, England. This page contains a chart of the Hazell's of Pulham & Pulham Market (my own Hazell's). The surname "Hazell" is probably derived from the hazel tree, which is common across much of Norfolk, it is likely the name arose independently across the county, in much the same way as Smith, Brown etc would have arisen. Hazell's in the far west of Norfolk likely include some who have crossed the border from Cambridgeshire, where the name is not uncommon (see the charts on the Hassell's of Cambridgeshire). The name also appears in Suffolk where it likely shares a similar origin to that in Norfolk. Please do not hesitate to email me with any corrections &/or additions to these charts.

Reproduction for the purpose of financial gain is prohibited. Redistribution of this material, in part or in its entirety, to a genealogical website/service which resells or charges for access is strictly prohibited - the material on this page is intended to be available free of charge and with unrestricted access. The data contained herein is for the most part either public domain or copyright of various statutory authorities, unless specified otherwise in the sources, and cannot be copyrighted by a third party. I make no claim regarding the accuracy of this chart; the original sources are not free from error and transcriptions may contain errors. Printing instructions: This document contains formatting which is incompatible with printing. To print use a text editor (eg: notepad) to remove all occurrences of "<fieldset>" and "</fieldset>" & then print in landscape mode, or email for a printable pdf. Last revision: 27th June, 2015. Layout & charts David Powell, email (roots-boots@hotmail.com), http://roots-boots.net/ft/names.html.



The earliest record of a Hazell in Pulham was that of the death & burial of Thomas Hesell, a servant of William Read.[1] Thomas died 1610 & was buried 9/4/1610, St Mary the Virgin, Pulham, Co Norfolk.[1] The next record is the death & burial of a daughter-in-law or (more likely) grand-daughter-in-law in 1668: Anna Hassal, widow, died 1668 & was buried 28/3/1668, St Mary the Virgin, Pulham, Co Norfolk.[1] Anna was likely the mother or grandmother of Thomas, below. Pulham/Pulham Market parish registers are almost complete back to the late 1600's.

Pulham St Mary (or Pulham St. Mary the Virgin, to give it its full name) is about 29 km south of Norwich. Today it is a small village and part of "The Pulhams" which also includes Pulham Market.[Wikipedia] Although lacking the village green of Pulham Market, the heart of the old village forms an interesting centre with the village pub, the former forge and the the old school being obvious features. To the north lies one of the village's big houses, The Grange. The village shop and post office is close to the centre, while the church and village hall are a few hundred yards to the east. The church, dedicated to St. Mary the Virgin, is believed to date from around 1258. The village boasts a fine collection of old buildings, around 80 of which are listed as being of architectural and historic interest. The village centre has a number of these old buildings, some thatched, all rendered and colour washed. Among the most interesting is the village's pub, the King's Head and what at first sight looks to be a fairly conventional Victorian school building, Pennoyer's School, parts of which are over 600 years old. The village sign stands near the King's Head and the old school and celebrates a more recent period in the village's history, when Pulham St Mary was home to airships of the Royal Naval Air Service.[53]

Settlement in Pulham is thought to date back to at least Roman times - pieces of Roman tile, coin and oyster shells have been found in the village. Garlic Street, the settlement in the easternmost part of the parish, is thought to have been so named because garlic was grown there for Spanish soldiers serving in the Roman army, though this is not proved. In the 10th century Pulham was in the ownership of Athelwold, Bishop of Winchester who gave it to the abbey of St Etheldreda at Ely, betwen 963 and 984AD. Control by the See of Ely imposed on Pulham villagers the obligation to supply it with provisions for two weeks each year. In 1066AD Pulham was described as two miles long by one mile wide, with a wood large enough to maintain 600 pigs, a mill, three working horses, 11 head of cattle, 40 pigs, 50 sheep, 40 goats and four beehives. Its value for tax purposes was 8. By the time of the Domesday survey in 1086 this had risen to 15 although the woodland by then could apparently only support 300 pigs, though this may have been the result of creative accounting to avoid excessive taxation. The name Pulham is thought to mean the homestead or enclosure by the pools or streams. Earliest records show the name as Polleham (c.1050) or Pullaham (1086) this latter spelling being the Domesday Book entry. In 1249AD, the monks were licensed to hold a weekly Wednesday market which took place in the western part of the parish. The development of houses in the vicinity of the market area eventually gave rise to the separate parish of Pulham Market. Although the Pulhams are now two separate villages, they were for many years ecclesiastically recognised as one parish and it was not until 1857 that they became separate livings.[53]


1. Thomas Hassal,[1] born before 1665. Died 6/1723, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1] Married Mary Chamberlain, 1/4/1684, Dunston, Co Norfolk.[6] Mary died 1734, buried 18/7/1734, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk (widow).[1]

Children of Thomas Hazell & Mary Chamberlain:
*
i.
 
Thomas Hassal, baptised 8/8/1686, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1]

ii.

William Hussel/Hassel, baptised 16/5/1689, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1] Died 1712/1713, buried 21/1/1712-1713, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1] William's will was probated, 1710-1715, a copy of the probate inventory is at the Norfolk Record Office.[62] At the time of his death William resided St Mary Magdalen Pulham Market.[62]

iii.

Susan Hassel, baptised 9/12/1690, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1]
*
iv.

John Hussal, baptised 5/10/1692, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1]

v.

Samuel Hussal, baptised 7/9/1695, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1] Probably the Samuel who died 1732 & buried 1/6/1732, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1]


1845: "PULHAM, ST. MARY MAGDALEN is a considerable village, about a mile north of the above, [Pulham St. Mary the Virgin] on an eminence, 4 miles N.W. of Harleston. Its parish had 1155 inhabitants in 1841, including 130 in Depwade Union Workhouse, which is described at page 699. It includes many scattered houses, and 2956A. 1R. 19p. of land, of which the commons called Bush-green, Colegate-end, and Gresham green, were enclosed in 1838-9. It is nearly all in Robert Copeman, Esq.'s manor of Pulham, (fines arbitrary) and anciently had a weekly market, and was noted for the manufacture of hats, dornecks, coverlets, &c. It has still a cattle fair, on the third Thursday in May. The Church is a large structure, with a tower and six bells, and its curacy, with all the tithes of the parish, is consolidated with the rectory of Pulham St. Mary the Virgin, as already noticed. The Hall, anciently a seat of a younger branch of the Percy family, was rebuilt by the late J. Crickmore, Esq., and is now the property of Laverock Leggett, Esq. The Town Estate which was vested in trust for the poor, as early as the 16th century, consists of two farm-houses, and 66A. of land, let for 23; and three cottages, let for 16 a year. Out of these rents, about 18 is paid yearly for the support of a Sunday-school, and the remainder, after paying for repairs, &c., is distributed in coals and clothing, among the poor. About 1832, the overseers enclosed 29A. from the wastes, to be cultivated by the poor, by spade husbandry. The Post Office is at Chas. Palmer's. Letters are received from Harleston, at 9 mng., and despatched at 5 evening." Taken from White's Directory, 1845.[48]

1850: "PULHAM ST. MARY MAGDALEN is a populous village near the main road, between Scole and Norwich, 4 miles N.W. of Harleston, 15 miles S. of Norwich, and about a mile from the Tivetshall Station of the Eastern Union Railway. Many of the houses are scattered about on fine healthy sites, and the surrounding scenery is picturesque and diversified. Pulham once had its weekly markets, and its manufactures of hats, coverlets, and dornicks, but these have long been obsolete, and the only manufacture carried on now is that of gloves. A cattle fair is annually held on the third Thursday in May. The parish comprises an area of 2956 acres, and the population in 1841 was 1155. Post-Office, at Elizabeth Palmer's. Letters delivered at 9.30 a.m. and despatched to Norwich and all parts, via Harleston, at 4.30 p.m." Taken from Hunt's Directory of East Norfolk with Part of Suffolk.[49]
     
The Crown Inn, Pulham Market
Image Geoff Pick, Geograph
Across village green, Pulham Market
Image Radek M.,  Flickr
The Green, Pulham Market
Image "Dewdrop",  Flickr
1883: "PULHAM ST. MARY MAGDALEN (commonly called PULHAM MARKET) is a parish and small town and station on the Waveney Valley branch of the Great Eastern railway, 15 miles south from Norwich, 4 north-by-west from Harleston and 104 from London, in the Southern division of the county, Earsham hundred, Depwade union, Harleston county court district, rural deanery of Redenhall, archdeaconry of Norfolk and diocese of Norwich. The church of St. Mary Magdalen is an old and handsome building, partly in the Perpendicular and partly in the Early English styles, consisting of chancel, nave and aisles, with a north porch and a square embattled tower, supported by buttresses at each corner, and containing 6 bells: in 1873 the church was restored and a vestry added, at a total cost of 1,800: at the same time a stained window was inserted, in memory of Mrs. Elizabeth Cole. The register dates from the year 1538. The living is a rectory, yearly value 646 tithe rent-charge, in the gift of the Crown and held since 1870 by the Rev. Spencer Fellows M.A. of Magdalene College, Cambridge, J.P. The Wesleyan and Primitive Methodists have each a chapel. A Cemetery containing one acre adjoining the church was consecrated May 1st, 1860. There is also a cemetery for Nonconformists on Cole's Common, about 1 miles from the church: the Cemeteries are under control of a Burial Board. There are several charities, consisting of houses and lands, realising 160 yearly, of which 30 is set aside for the church, and the remainder divided between the poor and the school in equal proportions. A small estate used to be held by service of blowing a horn at the opening of the Manor Court. Here is the workhouse for Depwade Union: it is a large plain brick building situated on the Norwich road and will hold 500 inmates. This place is popularly called Pulham Market, from there having been formerly a weekly market on Wednesdays, which has been removed to Harleston. A cattle fair was formerly held here. Leather gloves are made here. Pulham Market Hall was formerly the residence of the Percies, a younger branch of the Northumberland family, and is now the property and residence of George Leggett esq. The trustees of the late George Copeman esq. are lords of the manor. The principal landowners are George Leggett esq. W. Henry Cole esq. of London, and G.I. Bevan esq. The soil is heavy; subsoil, clay. The chief crops are wheat, barley, peas and beans. The area is 2,886 acres; rateable value, 4,217; and the population in 1881 was 1,127." Taken from "Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, pp. 467-468".[28]
Today: "Pulham Market, 'a typical English village' with a picturesque green at its centre, surrounded by attractive thatched cottages. To the north of The Green stands the village Memorial Hall and the Falcon public house. To the south is the well known thatched 17th century public house, The Crown. The Church of St Mary Magdalene is situated south of the village green and set in beautiful grounds surrounded by a variety of mature trees. Pulham Market has two churches - the parish church of St Mary Magdalene, a beautiful 15th century building to the south of The Green, and Pulham Market Methodist Church, a recently extended 19th century red-brick building with adjoining meeting hall, situated at the junction of ColegateEnd Road and Tattlepot Roads." Taken from Pulham Market homepage.[50] "The centre of Pulham Market is is the village green, which is wide without sprawling, with two old inns facing each other across it. Behind one is the church, with its powerful 15th century tower. The inns, and many of the other houses, date from the 18th and even 17th centuries. Chocolate box scenes like this are rarer in East Anglia than you might think, and no one would seriously think of Pulham Market as a town today. But the green was the former market place, and as the name suggests this was a market town from the 12th century until well into the 17th century. There was a railway station, but the line has now gone, and the main Ipswich to Norwich road now bypasses the village. For most people, their abiding image of Pulham will be the old workhouse, now converted into flats with a garden centre surreally in front of it, on the A140 to the west of here."[51]

The Crown Inn, Pulham Market
Image Francis Firth Photography
Cottage, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk
Image "Radek M",  Flickr
Manor Farm, Pulham Market
Image "Dumbledad",  Flickr



1.1. Thomas Hassal,[4] baptised 8/8/1686, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1] Died 1742 & buried 26/7/1742, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1] Married Susanna[4] Dunn, 22/5/1711, St Mary the Virgin, Pulham, Co Norfolk.[1] Married by licence.[1] Susan baptised 14/8/1687, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market Market, Co Norfolk, d/o John & Mary Dunn,[3] Died 1758 & buried 30/5/1758, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1]

Children of Thomas Hazell & Susanna Dunn:

i.
 
Mary Hasell, baptised 3/3/1711-1712, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[4]

ii.

Ann Hassel, baptised 14/6/1713, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1] Died 1713/1714, buried 29/1/1713-1714, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1]

iii.

Ann Hassel, baptised 15/8/1714, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1,4]
*
iv.

Thomas Hassel, baptised 5/2/1715-1716, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1,4]
*
v.

John Hassel, baptised 2/6/1717, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1]

vi.
Samuel Hassel, baptised 19/9/1720, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1] Probably the Samuel who died 1744 & buried 8/3/1744, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1]

vii.
Richard Hassel, baptised 22/4/1722, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1] Died 1722, buried 1722, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1]


The Church of St Mary Magdalene, Pulham Market, is a big church, a town church. Externally, it is hard to see anything that is not late-medieval, and this building would look quite at home in the centre of Norwich. It was founded as a Chapel-of-Ease to the mother church at St Mary the Virgin, Pulham to serve the community which had grown around the open space where a flourishing market was developing. The church ceased to be a Chapel-of-Ease in 1858 when the living was divided. The existing building, possibly replacing an earlier structure, dates from the early fourteenth century to the late fifteenth. The south arcade is ealier than the north, suggesting that the church originally consisted of nave and chancel, with succesive additions following the increasing prosperity of the market end of Pulham in the later middle ages.[50,51]
The outstanding item in the church is the arch-braced roof in natural oak. The mouldings and enrichments of the roof are worth examination. The eastern panel, orignally a panoply of honour for the rood, was repainted in 1873. The aisle roofs are also original medieval work. The font is victorian although the wooden cover modern. The cross and dove from the top of the old font cover was restored in 1997, and is now located in a window of the north aisle. The chancel was heavily restored in 1873, the windows replaced and the vestry added. The painting over the chancel arch, showing the Ascension, was done in 1895 as a memorial to members of the Fellows family. The remains of the medieval screen are under the tower arch. The Tower was built in four stages in the fifteenth century, c:1435. The North Porch is perhaps the finest part of the exterior, built with money left in a will of 1456. It has flushwork planelling and finely worked detail. There is a Priest's room above. It is clear that the north aisle was added after the porch was built. Fourteen and fifteenth century fragments of stained glass are found in the west window of the North aisle. Other glass is Victorian, the most notable being the east window with panels depicting Mary Magdalene washing Christ's feet, the crucification and Mary Magdalene telling the disciples of Christ's resurrection. This together with the other stained glass windows was inserted at or subsequent to restoration of 1873. Pulham Market Church remains an active church with services each Sunday.[50,51]
   
St Mary Magdalene, Pulham Market

Image Simon Knott, Norfolk Churches
St Mary Magdalene
Churches of UK & Ireland
Steve Bulman
St Mary Magdalene
Image, Norfolk Churches
Simon Knott
St Mary Magdalene, c.1920

Image - Norfolk Transcription Archive



1.2. John Hussal,[4] baptised 5/10/1692, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1] Died 1732 & buried 18/10/1732, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1] Married Susan.[1,4] {Wife given as Sarah by [4] in 1719. No trace of marriage in IGI or FreeREG as either Susan or Sarah}

Children of John Hazell & Susan:

i.
 
Susanna Hazell, baptised 7/3/1719-1720, St Mary the Virgin, Pulham, Co Norfolk.[1,4] Died before 1726.

ii.

Esther Hassel/Hessel, born 20/4/1721,[4] St Mary the Virgin, Pulham,[1] baptised 20/4/1721, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1,4]

iii.

Elizabeth Hassel, baptised 31/5/1722, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1] Died 1722, buried 19/2/1722-1723, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1]
*
iv.

Thomas Heasel, baptised 2/2/1724-1725, St Mary the Virgin, Pulham, Co Norfolk.[1]

v.

Susannah Heasel, baptised 29/6/1726, St Mary the Virgin, Pulham, Co Norfolk.[1] Died 1788 & buried 24/10/1788, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk (wife of Thomas).[64] Married Thomas Cutting, 2/11/1760, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1] Witnesses were William Marjoram & Richard Boyce, by banns.[1] Thomas born 1727, died 1789 & buried 29/12/1789, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk (62yo).[64]
Children: (a)
 
John Cutting, baptised 15/3/1761, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[64]
(b)
Susanna Cutting, baptised 13/11/1763, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[64] Married Samuel Fuller.[64]
Children: (1)
 
Susanna Fuller, baptised 31/3/1787, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[64]
(c)
Mary Cutting, baptised 12/1766, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[64] Mary died 1791 & buried 22/10/1791, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk (25yo, singlewoman).[64]

vi.
Elizabeth Hasel, baptised 24/7/1729, St Mary the Virgin, Pulham, Co Norfolk.[1]

vii.
Ann Hasell/Hesell, baptised 26/2/1730-1731, St Mary the Virgin, Pulham, Co Norfolk.[1] Died 1731, buried 11/1731, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1]

viii.
Ann Hasell, baptised 9/12/1731, St Mary the Virgin, Pulham, Co Norfolk.[1] Married John Johnson, 1/8/1766, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1] Witnesses were Thomas Cutting (brother in law) & Humphrey Baley, by banns.[1]
Children: (a)
 
Phoebe Johnson, baptised 24/5/1767, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[64]
(b)
Phyllis Johnson, baptised 10/7/1768, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[64]
(c)
Jonathan Johnson, baptised 10/3/1771, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[64]

ix.
Sarah Hasell, baptised 18/2/1732-1733, St Mary the Virgin, Pulham, Co Norfolk.[1] Died 1734, buried 1/7/1734, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1]


1845: "PULHAM ST. MARY THE VIRGIN is a large village on an acclivity, 3 miles N.W. of Harleston, and has in its parish 924 souls, and 2998A. 3r. 32p. of land. Robert Copeman, Esq., of Aylesham, is lord of the manor, in which are many copyholds, subject to arbitrary fines. The large commons here and in Pulham St. Mary Magdalen, have been enclosed under an Act of Parliament, passed in 1838. The Church is a large antique fabric, with a lofty square tower, six bells, and a handsome porch in the florid Gothic style, ornamented with large figures of angels, &c. The stained glass in the east window was destroyed by a storm in 1818, when the south chancel window was also blown out. The rectory with Pulham St. Mary Magdalen annexed to it, is valued in K.B. at 33. 6s. 8d., and the tithes of the two parishes were commuted in 1837 for 1308 per annum. The glebe is 36A., with a good residence. The patronage is in the Crown, and the Rev. Wm. Leigh, M.A. is the incumbent. In 1670, Wm. Pennoyer charged certain property which he left to Christ's Hospital in London, with the yearly payment of 4 for the poorest parishioners, and 5 for schooling poor children. He also directed that the future lords of the manor should pay one-fifteenth part of the rents and profits of the manors, so as to make up 20 a year for a schoolmaster,to teach 30 or 40 boys of the two parishes of Pulham and the adjacent places. Only 10 a year is paid by the present lord of the manor, and the master receives the above-named 5 out of Vaunces farm. The school is kept in a building called the Old Chapel. The Town Farm, 16A., is let for 25. 10s. a year, of which 10 is paid to the master of the Sunday School, and the remainder is applied with the church rates. A meadow, which had been long held by the Overseers, was sold about forty years ago, for the purpose of paying off a debt that had been incurred in erecting a Parish Workhouse, and enclosing 10A. of land from the South Common. The workhouse is now converted into five cottages. These and 73 allotments are let to the poor at low rents. A small estate here is held by the service of blowing a horn at the opening of the manor court, and 7A. by being "the lord's hangman," but the duties of the latter office have long been obsolete."[48]
1854: "PULHAM ST. MARY THE VIRGIN, a pleasant and well-built village, 3 miles N.W. of Harleston, has 196 houses, 918 souls, and 2,998a. 3r. 32p. of land, Robt. Copeman, Esq., is lord of the manor, in which are many copyholds, subject to arbitrary fines. The enclosure of the commons took place under an act passed in 1838. The Church is a commodious edifice with a lofty tower, and six bells, and a handsome porch ornamented with figures of angels. A storm, in 1818, destroyed the stained glass in the east window, when the window in the south chancel was also blown out. The rectory is valued in the King's book at 33 6s. 8., with Pulham St. Mary Magdalen annexed to it; and the tithes of the two parishes were commuted in 1837 for 1,308. There are 36a. of glebe. The patronage is vested in the Crown, and the Rev. Wm. Leigh, M.A., is the incumbent. Wm. Pennoyer, in 1670, charged certain property with the payment of 4 yearly to the poor, and 5 for schooling children. He also directed that the future lords of the manor should pay one fifteenth part of the profits of the manors, so as to make up 20 a year for a schoolmaster to teach 30 or 40 boys of the two parishes of Pulham and the adjacent places. Only 10 a year is now paid by the lord of the manor, and the master receives the above-named 5 out of Vaunce's farm. The town farm, 16a., is let for 25 10s. a year, of which 10 is paid to the master of the Sunday school, and the remainder is applied with the church rates. The Old Workhouse is converted into five cottages. A number of small allotments are let to the poor at low rents. A small estate here is held by the service of blowing a horn, at the opening of the manor court, and 7a. being "the lord's hangman ;" but the duties of the latter office have long ceased. The Baptists have a small chapel here."[54]
1883: "PULHAM ST. MARY THE VIRGIN is a pleasant village and parish, and station on the Waveney Valley branch railway, situated on an elevation, 3 miles north-west from Harleston, in the Southern division of the county, Depwade union, Earsham hundred, county court district of Harleston, rural deanery of Redenhall, archdeaconry of Norfolk and diocese of Norwich. The church of St. Mary is a handsome structure of stone and flint, in the Perpendicular style: it consists of chancel, nave and aisles, and on the south-west side is a handsome porch (supposed to have been built by William de Wykeham, who was rector of the parish), with lofty square embattled tower containing 6 bells: the exterior is ornamented with various carved figures, and on the top are five figures curiously carved: the interior is lofty, and some of the windows contain stained glass: the nave and chancel have been re-seated with oak, and the screen has been partially restored. The registers date as far back as 1538, when first ordered in Henry VIII's time. The living is a rectory, tithe rent-charge 662, with 32 acres of glebe and residence, in the gift of the Crown and held by the Rev. Richard Bond M.A, of Corpus Christi college, Cambridge: in 1670 it was endowed by William Pennoyer esq. with 1-15th part of the profits of the manor for the master who keeps the parish school in the old guild chapel of St. James. The Baptists have a chapel here. There are several small charities: W. Pennoyer's consists of 4 yearly, paid out of a farm belonging to the Governors of Christ's Hospital, which is given away by the rector and tenant of the farm in money to the poor. The common land has been enclosed under an Act of Parliament passed in 1838. The trustees of the late George Copeman esq. are lords of the manor. The principal landowners are Lord Waveney, the Governors of Christ's Hospital, Major Patten and R.A. Bevan esq. The soil is mixed; subsoil, gravel and clay. The chief crops are wheat, barley, peas and beans. The area is 2,966 acres; the rateable value, 4,289 5s.; and the population in 1881 was 822."[55]
Today: "Pulham St Mary is a large parish, principally a farming community, with around 365 houses and 800 inhabitants. A significant number of self-employed people live and work in the area. Pulham St Mary with Pulham Market to the west and Starston to the east together make up the ward of Beck Vale. In total, just over 2,100 people live in Beck Vale (2004 data), with Pulham Market having the largest population of the three villages."[57]

Pulham St Mary from Pennoyer's School
Image Pennoyer's School
Thatched cottage, Pulham St Mary
Image Peggy Cannell, Pictures of England
Kings Head Tavern, Pulham
Image - EDP24

As at neighbouring Pulham Market, Pulham St Mary is dominated by its grand, mostly Perpendicular church, this one set on a rise above the village street in a wide graveyard. There are similarities between the two churches, but big differences too; St Mary's porch is much earlier than the rest of the two churches, and the tower here is rather more feminine, with its pretty pinnacles and large bell openings. And, of course, there is the most famous feature of either church, St Mary's gorgeous late 15th century porch, perhaps the best in Norfolk. Tower and porch work together to create a sense of grandeur, but in fact this is not a huge church, and there is no aisle on the north side. The porch is magnificent. Actually not as huge as it appears, its two stories are flanked by ranges of flushwork panelling, which become, from the top on the front, ranks of stone niches, angels holding shields, angels with musical instruments and then more niches. Pride of place, in the spandrels of the doorway, is the Annunciation, of the highest artistic quality and in lovely condition.[56]

There was an Anglo-Saxon Church in Pulham which is mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1080, but of this there is no trace. The present Church is thought to date from about 1253. There is seating accommodation for about three hundred people. The porch is thought generally to have been built about the year 1478 with the assistance of John Moreton, Bishop of Ely. It is thought that the tower dates from the 15th century. A new parapet and larger windows were added later. It contains a clock and eight bells. The screen which divided the tower from the body of the church is made of oak from timber grown locally. There is a fine linenfold panelling on the exterior of the west door. The tower arch is not in proportion to the nave. It stands not in the centre of the nave's west end, but in line with the chancel arch. Perhaps the tower and the chancel were built either both at the same time, or, at least, they were built before the present nave. The Tower once had a spire, but it was lost in 1738. The Chancel is one of the oldest parts of the church and contains some very interesting features. Some of the architecture may belong to the Decorated Period (1280-1350).[52]

St Mary the Virgin, Pulham
Image Dale Reynolds,  Flickr
Porch, St Mary the Virgin, Pulham
Simon Knott, Norfolk Churches
St Mary the Virgin, Pulham
Simon Knott, Norfolk Churches



1.1.1. Thomas Hassel,[2] baptised 5/2/1715-1716, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1,4] Died 1747 & buried 6/10/1747, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1] Married Susan,[1,2,4] probably between 1735-1745. {No trace of marriage in IGI or FreeREG} Susan was probably the "widow Hazel" died 1767 & buried 15/12/1767, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1]

Children of Thomas Hazell & Susan:
*
i.
 
Thomas Hazel/Hazle,[1,2,4] born before 1748. {Presumed son. Thomas (1.2.1) had a son, Thomas, baptised 1765, too young. John (1.2.2) was baptised 1729 & so was probably too young to have had a son born before 1748, leaving the only other known adult Hazell - Thomas (1.1.1)}

ii.

Mary Hasel/Hazwell, baptised 25/8/1745, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1,2,4] Died 1753, buried 26/7/1753, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[2]

iii.

Samuel Heasel/Hassel, baptised 17/1/1747-1748, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1,2] Died 1748/1749, buried 8/2/1748-1749, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1,2]




1.1.2. John Hassel, baptised 2/6/1717, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1] John died before 1763. Married Anne Berry, 7/2/1755, St Margaret, Topcroft, Co Norfolk.[1] At the time of the marriage John resided Ketteringham, Co Norfolk.[1] Anne married 2nd John Browne, 7/7/1763, St Mary the Virgin, Pulham, Co Norfolk.[3,5]

Children of John Hazell & Anne Berry:

i.
 
Ann Hasel, baptised 27/4/1755, St Margaret, Topcroft, Co Norfolk.[1,3] Died 1755 & buried 23/5/1755, St Margaret, Topcroft, Co Norfolk.[1]
*
ii.

John Hazel, baptised 21/1/1757, St Mary the Virgin, Pulham, Co Norfolk.[1]


Topcroft. Scattered around the main road village of Woodton are three churches in the fields, all of which are lovingly-kept and welcoming, being part of the splendid Hempnall group of parishes. St Margaret is, externally at least, the most beautiful of the three, with an elaborate octagonal crowning in two stages to the round tower base, the top one just like neighbouring Bedingham, and a super red-brick 18th century chancel. This is an unusual date at which to find such a large chancel, but the windows are Victorian, and so we may assume that a ruinous chancel was replaced because of the need of a suitable room, for a school perhaps.[58] 1845: "TOPCROFT, a scattered village, 12 miles S. by E. of Norwich, and 5 miles N.W. by W. of Bungay, has in its parish 475 souls, and 1,864 acres of land, including 90A. of wood. The Rev. William John Smyth owns a great part of the soil, and is lord of the manor, in which the copyholders pay certain fines. The Church (St Margaret,) has a tower, round at the base, and octangular above. The rectory, valued in K.B. at 10 13s. 4d., and in 1831 at 400, has about 40A. of glebe. The Bishop of Norwich is patron, and the Rev. Edward Wilson, incumbent. The tithes were commuted in 1839 for 396 per annum."[59]

St Margaret, Topcroft, Norfolk
Image Simon Knott, Norfolk Churches
St Mary, Long Stratton, Norfolk
Image Simon Knott, Norfolk Churches
The Street, Long Stratton, c.1910
Simon Knott, Long Stratton Photo Archive
 
STRATTON ST. MARY, or LONG STRATTON, is a small Market Town, on the Roman street or way which led to Caistor; being 10 miles S. by W. of Norwich, 9 miles N. by E. of Scole Inn, and 100 miles N.E. of London. Its parish contains 690 inhabitants, and 1517A. of land, including the hamlet of Wood-green, 1 mile E.N.E. of the town, which forms a long street of good houses. It has a small corn market every Tuesday afternoon, at the Angel Inn, and two fairs yearly, on Whit-Tuesday and October 12th, for pedlery, &c. Here is also a Hiring Session on the day before that at Shottisham. The lord of the manor and principal owner of the soil is the Rev. Ellis Burroughes, of Stratton House, a handsome brick mansion on a pleasant eminence. The Hall, which had a deep moat, is now a farm house. In 1773, several Roman urns were found here in a gravel pit, six feet below the surface; and about a furlong from the town was discovered a hearth, four yards square, and having upon it ashes and burnt earth, three inches deep, with two imperfect copper coins. The church (St Mary) is a large handsome fabric, with an ancient round tower, containing five bells, and surmounted by a short spire. The tower is much older than the church, the latter being rebuilt about 1330, by Sir Roger de Burgh, and his family, to whom here are many monumental memorials; but all their brasses, except two, are gone. The late rector, who held the living from 1795 till 1842, decorated the east window with stained glass, in 1805. At the east end of the chancel lie the effigies of Judge Reeve and his lady; the former died in 1647, and the latter in 1657. The rectory, valued in the King's Book at 10, is in the gift of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, and incumbency of of the Rev. Fredk. Wm. Hill Jerrard. The glebe is about 40A., and the tithes were commuted in 1838 for 468 per annum."[60] The village is situated half-way between the regional capital, Norwich and the market town of Diss; along the Roman built road, the A140 (once know as Pye Street) - which runs from Cromer (North Norfolk) to Ipswich (Suffolk). The parish borders that of Pulham Market.[Wikipedia]



1.2.1. Thomas Heasel,[4] baptised 2/2/1724-1725, St Mary the Virgin, Pulham, Co Norfolk.[1] Died 1799 & buried 2/8/1799, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1] On 26/8/1780 Thomas, along with Susan Leverer, were living in a cottage & yard, Pulham Market, at the yearly rent of 3.10s.[63] Notice was posted on 26/8/1780 for the sale, at auction, of the property on 7/9/1780 at the Crown Inn, Pulham Market.[63] Auction held by Charles Punchard of Roydon.[63] Mr Meadows & Mr Brown, both of Diss, were listed as sources for further details (possibly the owners?).[62] {Presumably this refers to this Thomas. Another Thomas Hazell (1.1.1.1) appears to have left before 1780. The identity of Susan is unknown, Thomas was married to Mary at the time. Susan may be Thomas' daughter, Susan, baptised 1757} Married Mary[1,4] Riches, 21/2/1757, St Mary, Long Stratton, Co Norfolk.[1] By banns.[1] Mary was of Long Stratton & Thomas of Pulham Market.[1] Mary, born 1731, died 1807 & buried 2/7/1807, St Mary Magdalene, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk (76yo, widow).[2]

Children of Thomas Hazell & Mary Riches:

i.
 
Henry Heggall/Hezzall, baptised 12/5/1754, St Mary the Virgin, Pulham, Co Norfolk.[1] {could be a red herring or possibly a previous marriage to another Mary}

ii.

Susan Hazle, baptised 10/5/1757, St Mary, Long Stratton, Co Norfolk.[1]

iii.

Mary Hazell, baptised 22/11/1758, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1] {Father listed as Robert but presumably a mistake as that name is unknown in Pulham}
Children: (a)
 
Harriet Hazle, baptised 7/11/1782, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk (baseborn).[2]

iv.

Esther Hazell, baptised 24/4/1761, St Mary the Virgin, Pulham, Co Norfolk.[1,4] Died  1778 & buried 18/9/1778, St Mary the Virgin, Pulham, Co Norfolk.[1]

v.

Thomas Heazell, baptised 26/5/1765, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[2]
* vi.
Sarah Hazle, baptised 22/1/1770, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1] Married William Allman, 1/6/1790, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1] Witnesses were Charles Elmer & John Boyce, by banns.[1]


The Angel Inn, Long Stratton
Simon Knott, Long Stratton Photo Archive
Village Hall, Long Stratton
Simon Knott, Long Stratton Photo Archive
The Plain, Long Stratton, c.1910
Simon Knott, Long Stratton Photo Archive



1.1.1.1. Thomas Hazel/Hazle,[1,2,4] born before 1748. Died 1806, Norwich, Co Norfolk & buried 1/12/1806, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1,2] Resided Norwich, Co Norfolk, at the time of his death.[1,2] Married Elizabeth[1,2,4] Poll,[1,2] 20/10/1768, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[2] By licence.[2] Elizabeth born 1744, died 1806, Norwich, Co Norfolk & buried 22/5/1806, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk (62yo, w/o Thomas).[1,2] At the time of her death, Elizabeth resided Norwich, Co Norfolk.[1,2] Thomas & Elizabeth were witnesses, 8/11/1803, at the marriage of Thomas Fryer & Sarah Cole, St Andrew, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[1] Thomas Fryer was of Morningthorpe, Co Norfolk.[1]

Children of Thomas Hazell & Elizabeth Poll:
*
i.
 
Thomas Hazel, baptised 14/10/1770, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1,2]

ii.

Elizabeth Hazle/Hazel, baptised 23/8/1772, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1,2] Died 1775, buried 19/1/1775, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1,2]

iii.

Samuel Hazle/Hazel, baptised 29/5/1774, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1,2,4] Died 1774, buried 20/11/1774, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1,2]

iv.

John Hazel (s/o Thomas & Elizabeth).[1] Died 1776, buried 6/3/1776, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1,2]

v.

Elizabeth Heasell, born 1777.[1] Died 1834 & buried 25/4/1834, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk (57yo).[1]

vi.
Sarah Hazell,[1] born 1780's. Died 1786 & buried 19/9/1786, St John the Baptist, Morningthorpe, Co Norfolk.[1]




1.1.2.1. John Hazel,[4] baptised 21/1/1757, St Mary the Virgin, Pulham, Co Norfolk.[1] Married Susan,[4] about 1780. {No trace of marriage in IGI or FreeREG. John & Susan vanish after the baptism of their daughter. 1781. Their daughter, Ann, appears in Norwich in the 1851 & 1861 census}

Children of John Hazell & Susan:

i.
 
Ann Hasell, born 1778, St Saviour, Norwich, Co Norfolk,[9] baptised 14/12/1781, St Mary the Virgin, Pulham, Co Norfolk.[4] Died March quarter, 1863, Norwich, Co Norfolk,[12] & buried 11/3/1863, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk (80yo).[1] Resided 1851, Magdalene Street, Lings Court, St Saviour, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9] Annuitant, 1851, unmarried.[9] Living with her was Sophia Cook.[9] Resided 1861, Conisford, Norwich, Co Norfolk (with nieces, below).[16]

   
Lings Court, St Saviour, Norwich
Image - Plunkett's Norwich
47-51 Magdalene St, St Saviour, Norwich
Image - Plunkett's Norwich
47-49 Magdalene St, Norwich
Image - Plunkett's Norwich



1.1.1.1.1. Thomas Hazel, born 1770,[15] baptised 14/10/1770, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1,2] Died 1843, buried 25/4/1843, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk (76yo).[1] Baker, 1815,1816, 1818,1819.[1] Married Sarah[1] Hardesty, 1/10/1805, Saint Saviour, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[7] Sarah born 1782,[1,9,15] Sco Ruston, Co Norfolk,[9] died September quarter,[12] 1857, Norwich, Co Norfolk & buried 27/8/1857, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk (75yo).[1] At the time of her death, Sarah resided Norwich, Co Norfolk.[1] In 1851 Sarah was described as "Retired from Business".[9] Resided 1841, Depwade, Guiltcross & Hoxne district, Co Norfolk.[15] Sarah was probably the Mrs Heasell, shopkeeper, residing 1843, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[48] Resided 1851, Chapel Loke, St John Sepulchre, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9]

Children of Thomas Hazell & Sarah Hardesty:

i.
 
Elizabeth Poll Heasell, born 1807,[9,12,13,16] Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9] Died December quarter, 1874, Norwich, Co Norfolk (68yo).[12] In 1851 was incapacitated from a long illness.[9] Unmarried, 1851.[9] Resided 1851, Surrey Road, St John Sepulchre, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9] Elizabeth, along with two of her sisters, ran a ladies school (where they resided).[9] Also residing at the school was a student teacher, Mary Wilkin, a cook, Emily Pooley, a housemaid, Phoebe Legood, and 7 students, two from London, the rest from Norfolk, ranging from 10-15yo.[9] Resided 1861,1871, Conisford, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[13,16]

ii.

James Hazell, born 1807.[1] Died 1836, buried 7/12/1836, St John the Baptist, Morningthorpe, Co Norfolk (29yo).[1]

iii.

Mary Heasell, born 1811.[1] Died 1833, buried 14/7/1833, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk (22yo).[1]

iv.

Susanna Sarah Heasell, born 1813,[9,12,13,16] Pulham, Co Norfolk.[9] Died September quarter, 1874, Norwich, Co Norfolk (61yo).[12] Teacher in Ladies School, 1851.[9] Living with sister, Elizabeth.[9] Unmarried, 1851.[9] Resided 1851, Surrey Road, St John Sepulchre, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9] Resided 1861,1871, Conisford, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[13,16]

v.

Anne Christina Heasel, born 25/12/1813,[1,8,13,16] Pulham, Co Norfolk,[8,9] baptised 5/3/1815, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1] Died December quarter, 1897, Bath district, Co Somerset (82yo).[42] Living with parents, 1841.[15] Living with mother, 1851, unmarried - Chapel Loke, St John Sepulchre, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9] {Listed as Cloushana A.  Heasell in 1851 census, no occupation given.[9]} Resided 1861,1871, Conisford, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[13,16] Partner In Ladies School, 1881.[8] Resided, 1881, 1 Camden Crescent, Walcot, Bath, Co Somerset (with sister, Maria).[8] Living with them, 1881, was Emily Calver, cousin, born 1839, Banham, Co Norfolk.[8]

vi.
Thomas Peter Heasel/Heazel, born 23/9/1816,[1] baptised 13/10/1816, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1] Died 1817, buried 28/9/1817, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk (1yo).[1]

vii.
John Heasel, baptised 5/5/1818, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1] Died 1819, buried 11/7/1819, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk (1yo).[1]

viii.
Maria Heasel, born 28/9/1819,[1,8,9,13,16] Pulham, Co Norfolk,[8,9] baptised 19/12/1819, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1] Died June quarter, 1895, Bath district, Co Somerset (75yo).[42] Teacher in Ladies School, 1851.[9] Living with sister, Elizabeth.[9] Unmarried, 1851.[9] Resided 1851, Surrey Road, St John Sepulchre, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9] Resided 1861,1871, Conisford, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[13,16] Partner In Ladies School, 1881.[8] Resided, 1881, 1 Camden Crescent, Walcot, Bath, Co Somerset (with sister, Anne C.).[8]


St Michael's, Sco Ruston, 1978
Image - Plunkett's Norwich
Ruin of St Michael's, Sco Ruston, 2005
Image John Salmon, Geograph
St Saviour, Norwich, Norfolk
Image Simon Knott, Norfolk Churches

SCO-RUSTON, or South Ruston. 1845: "5 miles S. of North Walsham, has in its parish 115 souls, and 482 acres of land, mostly the property of Sir T.H.E. Durrant, the Rev. T. Mack, and Mr. Thomas Wells. The church (St Michael) is a small antique fabric, which was formerly larger, and had a tower, of which there are still some ivy-mantled ruins. The living is a curacy, consolidated with Tunstead vicarage, in the patronage and incumbency of the Rev. Thomas Mack. 1854: Has in its parish only 29 houses, 118 souls, and 480 acres, 2 roods, 24 perches of land, mostly belonging to Sir T. H. E. Durrant, the Rev. T. Mack, and Mr. Thos. Wells. The Church, dedicated to St. Michael, a small ancient edifice, was formerly larger and had a tower of which some ivy-mantled ruins still remain. The living is a curacy, consolidated with Tunstead Vicarage, in the patronage and incumbency of the Rev. Thos. Mack, M.A. The tithes were commuted in 1841 for 52 10s. to the incumbent, and 135 to the impropriator. 1883: Had in its parish in 1881 89 inhabitants, and comprises 482 acres of land, mostly the property of Lady Durrant and Mr. Thomas H. Wells. It is in Smallburgh union, Tunstead hundred, Happing and Tunstead petty sessional division, North Walsham county court district, Norwich bankruptcy district, Coltishall polling district of North Norfolk, Redenhall [sic - should be Waxham] rural deanery, and Norfolk archdeaconry. The rateable value in 1881 was 860. The church (St Michael) is a small antique fabric, which was formerly larger, and had a tower, of which there are still some ivy-mantled ruins. The chancel was restored in 1861 by G.R. Johnson, Esq., the impropriator. The living is a curacy, consolidated with Tunstead vicarage, in the patronage of Mrs. Catherine Mack, and incumbency of the Rev. George H. Harris."[61] The church had long since been abandoned by 1978, [Plunkett] by which time it was in a considerable state of disrepair. It has, since then, lost the roof and is now a rapidly decaying ivy-covered ruin, unrecognisable as the remains of a church, except from up close. Sco Ruston has effectively ceased to exist as a village & now consists of several farms and the ruins of the church.

83 Ber St, Norwich
Image - Plunkett's Norwich
81-83 Ber St, Norwich
Image - Plunkett's Norwich
18-20 Surrey St, Norwich
Image - Plunkett's Norwich
25-35 Surrey St, Norwich
Image - Plunkett's Norwich
 
Camden Crescent & Hedgemead Park, Bath, 1859
Image - Francis Frith Photography
Camden Crescent, Bath - 2007
Image Holiday Lets Bath
Georgian townhouses, Camden Crescent
Image QT Loung, Terragalleria


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[1] FreeREG: <http://freereg.rootsweb.com/cgi/Search.pl>, Search performed for Surname (with soundex) HAZELL, County Norfolk.
[2] FreeREG: <http://freereg.rootsweb.com/cgi/Search.pl>, Search performed for Surname (with soundex) HAZELL @ PULHAM.
[3]  IGI, CD-ROM Edition, 1997.
[4] Family search, http://www.familysearch.org: Patron ordinance submission sheets, 1969-1991, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Ba:8518332, So:1396047.
[5] Family search, 
http://www.familysearch.org: Patron ordinance submission sheets, 1969-1991, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Ba:7660033.
[6] Parish registers, 1557-1979, Church of England. Parish Church of Dunston (Norfolk),  Ba:M145151, So:1041498.
[7] Parish register transcripts, 1555-1812, Church of England. St. Saviour's Church (Norwich, Norfolk), 
http://www.familysearch.org.
[8] 1881 UK census, CD-ROM Edition.
[8] 1851 Norfolk census, CD-ROM Edition.
[10] Norfolk Voting Registers - Poll for Shropham Hundred 1768, <http://www.origins.org.uk/genuki/NFK/norfolk/voting/poll1768/shropham.shtml>.
[11] 1813 to 1880 Baptism Project, <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~tinstaafl>.
[12] FreeBMD, <http://www.freebmd.org.uk/>: Hazell (& phonetic variations) & Norfolk.
[13] 1871 census (1901 census online), <http://www.1901censusonline.com>.
[14] Norfolk Transcription Archive, <http://www.genealogy.doun.org/transcriptions/surnames.php?letter=H>
[15] 1841 census (1901 census online), <
http://www.1901censusonline.com>.
[16] 1861 census (1901 census online), <
http://www.1901censusonline.com>.
[17] Freecen 1861, Norfolk + Hazell (phonetic), <http://freecen.rootsweb.com/>.
[18] Freecen 1871, Norfolk + Hazell (phonetic), <
http://freecen.rootsweb.com/>.
[19] National Burial Index, Hazell & Norfolk, CD-ROM Edition.
[20] Freecen 1891, Norfolk + Hazell (phonetic), <
http://freecen.rootsweb.com/>.
[21] Crisp Family Tree, Darrin Crisp. Updated: 29/6/2008. <http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=crism143&id=I00130>.
Sources cited: 1871 England Census (Ancestry.com); Census Returns of England and Wales, 1871: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1871; 1881 England Census (Ancestry.com); Census Returns of England and Wales, 1881: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1881. Other sources implied but not stated. Contains several errors (IMHO).
[22] 1795-1797 Bury and Norwich Post newspaper archive, The Foxearth & District Local History Society, <http://www.foxearth.org.uk/1795-1797BuryNorwichPost.html>.
[23] Watkin Genealogy, Carole Marshall. Updated 8/4/2008. <http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=carolemarshall&id=I4787>.
[24] Banks, Jones and Jex Ancestors: Ray Banks. Updated 11/3/2008. <http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=rbanks&id=I6736>. Sources:
Blofield (1545-1915), North Walsham & Surlingham Parish Registers, Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah; 1841,1851,1861 & 1881 Norfolk census'.
[25] Banks, Jones & Jex Ancestors, Ray Banks. Updated 11/3/2008. <http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=rbanks&id=I10512>. Sources: 1851 Norfolk census; Barton Turf Norfolk Parish Register (1558-1920), Family History Library, Salt Lake City, UT; Norfolk Marriages 1801-1837, Norfolk Family History Society.
[26] Hazell family Norfolk, England. Query posted to GenForum Message Board by Murray Hazell, 11/10/2007, <http://genforum.genealogy.com/hazell/messages/39.html>.
[27] The Albrow Website: Family Trees - Butters. Includes Hazel, Brock, Cork and Quant, <http://albrow.net/familytrees_butters.html>. Sources cited (but not limited to) include: Norfolk Death Register  (sic), 1841,1861,1881 Census'.
[28] Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, pp. 467-468: Norfolk - Pulham Market, <http://apling.freeservers.com/Villages/PulhamMarket.htm>.
[29] Norfolk Public Houses: The Crown, Pulham Market, <http://www.norfolkpubs.co.uk/norfolkp/pulham/pulhcr.htm>.
[30] Post to Hazel-L Rootsweb maillist, Phil Gregory, "Hazle / Hazell - Barton Turf" 17/2/2006,<http://listsearches.rootsweb.com/th/read/HAZEL/2006-04/1144792127>. See also <http://tideswellman.blogspot.com>.
[31] Query posted to Rootsweb Norfolk mail-list, 4/2/2005, "John HAZEL & Mary BROOKS, Swanton Morley area, Abt 1795", Cliff, <http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/NORFOLK/2005-02/1107517488>.
[32] UK Vital Records Index, 2nd Edition. Cd-ROM Edition.
[33] Post to 'Genes & Things' mail-list, 14/6/2006, <http://groups.msn.com/Genesandthings/genunknown.msnw?action=get_message&mview=0&ID_Message=761&LastModified=4675576774987435257>.
[34] Post to Staff Surname list, Ancestry.com, 12/7/2006, Mary Todisco, <http://boards.ancestry.co.uk/surnames.staff/35/mb.ashx: STAFF>.
[35] Query posted to Norfolk message board, ancestry.com, 11/4/2007, <http://boards.ancestry.com/localities.britisles.england.nfk.general/19320/mb.ashx>.
[36] Query posted to Australian Convicts message board, ancestry.com, 5/4/2003, <http://boards.ancestry.com/localities.oceania.australia.convicts/116/mb.ashx>.
[37] Query posted to Norfolk message board, ancestry.com, 10/11/2003, <http://boards.ancestry.com/localities.britisles.england.nfk.general/2377/mb.ashx>.
[38] Query posted to Norfolk message board, ancestry.com, 11/4/2006, <http://boards.ancestry.com/localities.britisles.england.nfk.general/3562.1/mb.ashx>, cites 1841 census.
[39] Query posted to Norfolk message board, ancestry.com, 13/6/2006, <http://boards.ancestry.com/localities.britisles.england.nfk.general/3640.1/mb.ashx>, cites 1900 US census.
[40] Query posted to Norfolk message board, ancestry.com, 11/2/2007, <http://boards.ancestry.com/surnames.hazel/261.2.1/mb.ashx>.
[41] Query posted to Hazell message board, ancestry.com, 10/2/2008, Clare Lomas, <http://boards.ancestry.com/surnames.hazell/61.2.2.3/mb.ashx>.
[42]  FreeREG: <http://freereg.rootsweb.com/cgi/Search.pl>, Search performed for Surname (with soundex) HAZELL, County Somerset.
[43] The Foxearth & District Local History Society, 1835 Bury and Norwich Post newspaper archive, <http://www.foxearth.org.uk/1835BuryNorwichPost.html>.
[44] 1841 Norfolk Census Index, Ancestryaid.co.uk, <http://www.ancestryaid.co.uk/search/index.php>.
[45] New South Wales BMD Indices, CD-ROM Edition.
[46] Descendants of William Hazell, <http://www.weatherwatching.oz2k.com/hazelltree/D1.htm>. Last updated 9/4/2003. Sources: BMD Indices, Ticket of Leave - William Hazel, ToL#46/265, sundry BMD certificates.
[47] West Australia BMD Indices, CD-ROM Edition.
[48] Pulham Market,White's Directory, 1845, <http://www.gurney.co.uk/halliday/beckvale/pmkwh45.HTM>, also Pulham, <http://www.gurney.co.uk/halliday/beckvale/psmwh45.htm>.
[49] Pulham Market, Hunt's Directory of East Norfolk with Part of Suffolk, 1850, <http://www.origins.org.uk/genuki/NFK/places/p/pulham_market/hunt1850.shtml>.
[50] Welcome to Pulham Market, <http://www.pulham-market.co.uk/>.
[51] Churches of Norfolk: Pulham Market, <http://www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/pulhammarket/pulhammarket.htm>.
[52] The Church of Pulham St Mary the Virgin, <http://www.gurney.co.uk/halliday/beckvale/psmchur.htm>.
[53] Pulham St Mary, <http://www.gurney.co.uk/halliday/beckvale/psm.htm>.
[54] Pulham St Mary the Virgin, Francis White's History, Gazetteer, and Directory, of Norfolk 1854, pp.380-381, <http://apling.freeservers.com/Villages/PulhamStMaryTheVirgin54.htm>.
[55] Pulham St Mary, Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, p.468, <http://apling.freeservers.com/Villages/PulhamStMary.htm>.
[56] Churches of Norfolk: Pulham, <http://www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/pulhamstmary/pulhamstmary.htm>.
[57] Pulham St Mary and Beck Vale, <http://pennoyers.org.uk/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=54&Itemid=80#penn102>.
[58] Churches of Norfolk: Topcroft, <http://www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/topcroft/topcroft.htm>.
[59] Topcroft, Norfolk, White's History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Norfolk 1845, <http://www.origins.org.uk/genuki/NFK/places/t/topcroft/white1845.shtml>.
[60] Long Stratton St. Mary, William White's History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Norfolk 1845, <http://www.origins.org.uk/genuki/NFK/places/l/long_stratton/mary/white1845.shtml>
[61] William White's History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Norfolk 1845, Sco Ruston, <http://www.origins.org.uk/genuki/NFK/places/s/sco_ruston/white1845.shtml>; Francis White's History, Gazetteer, and Directory, of Norfolk 1854, p.548, Sco Ruston, <http://apling.freeservers.com/Villages/ScoRuston54.htm>; William White's History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Norfolk 1883, Sco Ruston, <http://www.origins.org.uk/genuki/NFK/places/s/sco_ruston/white1883.shtml>.
[62] Probate for William Hassel, 1710-1715, Norfolk Record Office online catalogue, <http://nrocat.norfolk.gov.uk/Dserve/dserve.exe?
dsqServer=128.60.0.31&dsqIni=Dserve.ini&dsqApp=Archive&dsqDb=Catalog&dsqCmd=Show.tcl&dsqSearch=(RefNo=='DN/INV/71/1')>.
[63] 1780 Norfolk Chronicle newspaper Selections, The Foxearth and District Local History Society, <http://www.foxearth.org.uk/1780NorfolkChronicle.html>. & also at <http://www.origins.org.uk/genuki/NFK/norfolk/newspapers/nfkchron/1780/08.shtml>.
[64] FreeREG: <http://freereg.rootsweb.com/cgi/Search.pl>, Search performed for Surname (with soundex) Cutting & Johnson @ PULHAM.

[65] Personal correspondence, Brenda Hawkins, 3/2/2010.
[66] Personal correspondence, Stephen Hutton, 27/12/2010.
[67] Personal correspondence, David Hopson, 15/12/2010, 16/12/2010. Sources include familysearch.org, family records & 1841 census.

[68] Personal correspondence, Hazel Hartung Colburn, 14/6/2011, 21/6/2011, 27/6/2011, 1/12/2013, 28/11/2014. Sources include will of Edmund Heasel, St Clair Co, Michigan, passenger manifests, parish & court records.
[69] Personal correspondence, Katie Allwright, 8/4/2014. Cites marriage certificate, Charles Hazel.
[70] Personal corresondence, Richard Hazel of Portsmouth, Hampshire, 27/8/2012. Cites attestation papers for Thomas Hazel.
[71] Personal correspondence, Stuart Laing, 13/5/2015.
[72] Personal correspondence, Veronica (no surname), 29/12/2012..